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Animals and the Environment...

Our Mutual Concerns


Air Quality

Fact Concern
Field studies show large decreases in frog and salamander populations. One suspected factor is acid rain. Are our fireplaces and medical waste incinerators contributing to this decline?
Indoor air quality has been shown to be a factor in asthma in cats and lung cancer in dogs. Are we considering indoor environmental health including second-hand smoke, synthetic carpeting, and radon- in our history taking?

Water Quality

Fact Concern
Animal waste, agricultural run-off, and solid waste leachate, all contribute to chemical and microbial contamination of groundwater and surface waters. What is the water quality in our communities? Can our knowledge of livestock management be better utilized to protect that water quality?
A significant number of Americans are concerned enough about drinking water quality to use only bottled water. Yet their pets still drink tap or well water. Are tap or well water contaminants affecting the health of our animal patients?

Climate Change

Fact Concern
Atmospheric changes have already led to measurable increases in ultraviolet radiation exposure to people and animals. We protect ourselves with sunscreen and clothing. What are the risks to animal health as a result of their increased radiation exposure due to stratospheric ozone depletion?
The distribution of vector-borne diseases, such as encephalitis, Lyme disease, heartworm and malaria, are increasing due to warmer, more humid weather. Are veterinary researchers and teachers preparing the profession to anticipate and adapt to these changes?

Biodiversity

Fact Concern
Feral pigs are devastating neotropical bird habitat in the Hawaiian Islands. Zebra mussels are inundating the Great Lakes. How can we apply our expertise in comparative reproductive physiology to control the invasion of exotic species such as these?
It is estimated that one-fourth of all species will become extinct in the next 50 years. At the current rate of tropical forest loss, we can expect a loss of 74 species per day, or 3 species per hour. How many products that could be used as pharmaceuticals, synthetic petroleum substitutes, foods, fibers and nutritional supplements will go undiscovered because of species extinction?

| GOALS | ACTIVITIES | FACTS & CONCERNS | EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS |
| CAREER TOOLS | JOB OPENINGS | FACT SHEETS |
| AMPHIBIANS AS SENTINELS | CLIMATE AND HEALTH | NEWSLETTER EXCERPTS |
| ANNUAL REPORT | MEETING REPORT | MEMBERSHIP |
| RELATED SITES | HOME |

Site Designer: C. M. Brown, DVM, MSc at cm_brown@ix. netcom.com